CultureConnect.com

Books for Less
CONTRIBUTE | TELL A FRIEND | NEWSLETTER | ADVERTISERS | CONTACT US
Travel Stories  Local Reports  Travelers' Webpages  World Webcams  Country Information
Home : Travel Stories   : India
"I gave him the money I had on me, my heart aching. He continued to follow me. He actually followed me for around 20 minutes.. It was the longest 20 minutes of my life."
- Ingunn Gjoerva

Enter email to subscribe to free newsletter:

Subscribe
Unsubscribe


India

India is an addiction
by Ingunn Gjoerva, 32, Oslo, Norway
Mar 9, 2000

contribute a story   subscribe to newsletter   make a comment  
India Travel Guide  Southern Asian Travel Stories  Asian Webcams  India Profile  Map of India

When we eventually steered towards the ghat where we had started out, I had an eerie feeling, the sights and the smells still fresh in my mind. We had a bus we had to get to, but as it was impossible for the bus to drive down the narrow streets towards the river, we had a fairly long walk ahead of us. They myriad of narrow streets were crowded like only an Indian street can be, with small shops on both sides, bicycles, rickshaws, cows - and people, people, people. The noise can be deafening. We were moving pretty fast, and it was not easy to stick together through the crowds. Still being freaked out about my experiences on the river, I worked up a panic about getting separated from the others. If I had actually lost the group nothing worse would have happened than me having to take a taxi, but as I was feeling weird, spooky and paranoid at the time, the thought was no great comfort.

Not only did you have the crowds to deal with, but also aggressive salesmen and of course the beggars. Varanasi seems to have a lot of beggars who are victims of leprosy. This is a scary disease. They have lost fingers, they have lost toes. Some have lost their lower body and are pulled around in carts. Many have lost their noses and have faces all twisted up, and some have no ears. They have incredibly dirty bandages around the stumps of their fingers and toes. As we walked through the streets, one was being particularly aggressive, shouting at me, following me, sticking his twisted noseless face almost into mine. I gave him the money I had on me, my heart aching. He continued to follow me. He actually followed me for around 20 minutes, all while I was hurrying through the crowds, panicky to stay with the rest of the group. It was the longest 20 minutes of my life.

Next morning we left India for Nepal. In comparison Nepal seemed "civilised", clean, silent, unobtrusive, and with such gentle people. I had a feeling of great relief, and vowed never to go back to India. I had experienced a massive overload. This feeling stayed with me for a while after I got home. But once you have been to India the memory sticks with you like glue, you can't shake it. I don't know what it is about this country. But only a year later I went back for more. And I know I will do so again.

Back to Home

send this story to a friend
contribute a story   subscribe to newsletter   make a comment


about us | privacy | submit url | contribute | free newsletter | advertise with us | contact us

Copyright  1999-2000 CultureConnect.com   All Rights Reserved.